After the pandemic’s effect on the aviation industry in March, global airline capacity peaked in the last week of December 2020 with 63.1 million seats. The beginning of January 2021 has, however, brought another drop in capacity numbers. At the moment, the global size of the industry counts 59.1 million seats per week.

After reaching the peak in the second half of March 2020 with 32.9 million seats and a significant drop at the beginning of April, Asian capacity had an unstable growth until today, counting at the beginning of January 2021 – 31.2 million seats.

North America has reached a peak in mid-March with 28 million seats scheduled, after which the numbers significantly dropped and stagnated for more than four months. After a nominal growth during December and the beginning of January, the second week of January brought decreasing numbers again, with a total of 14.2 million scheduled seats per week.

After reaching a peak in mid-August, with 15.9 million scheduled seats, European capacity numbers dropped significantly until December, when they shortly recovered due to increased demand during the holiday season. Since the beginning of January 2021, however, they are decreasing again, with a current capacity of 7.1 million offered seats per week.

With a significant fall after reaching its peak in the mid of March 2020 with 5.5 million seats scheduled and the lowest point in mid-May, counting 310.322 seats only, South America continues with a stable road to recovery. It is now reaching a total of 3.3 million seats scheduled per week.

After reaching 3.4 million seats in mid-March and a significant fall to 1.2 million seats only a week after, the African market has shown us light amplitudes but still kept the rising trend. December brought stagnating numbers while the beginning of January counts a total of 1.7 million seats scheduled.

After a significant fall at the beginning of April, the recovery in Oceania had kept a positive trend in the last eight months and now counts 1.4 million offered seats per week.

With a load factor of 84%, GOL Linhas Aereas Inteligentes from Brazil leads the Top 25 Airlines list with the highest load factors in November. In November, the lowest load factor had Scoot from Singapore, with a load factor of only 14%.

We will continue to monitor the situation on capacities and will post on our blog. Follow us here and on LinkedIn.

From August 2020 until today, we can notice a positive trend in growing numbers, with more and more aircraft coming back out of temporary storage. At the beginning of January, we’re counting 7.345 aircraft still grounded and 75% of the global fleet as active.

North America (80%) and Asia (78%) are still leading with the highest percentage of active fleets. They are followed by Oceania and South America, with 77% (Oceania) and 73% (South America). Due to many restrictions and lockdowns, Europe counts only 66% of its fleet active.

ContinentsActiveGroundedTotal% active
Africa772484125665.18%
Asia76522229988177.89%
Europe42172386660366.35%
North America61171713783079.61%
Oceania59819779577.41%
South America770336110672.97%
TOTAL2012673452747174.74%
*January 2020 total as a reference

We understand grounded fleets do not fully represent airline activity as airlines inevitably have different utilization levels for specific aircraft.

When it comes to the TOP 10 countries with the highest percentage of active fleets, counting more than 100 registered aircraft, Japan leads with 93% of the active fleet with 614 aircraft. The list is followed by China, Ethiopia, Taiwan, Netherlands, Mexico, Viet Nam, Brazil, India, New Zealand.

CountryActiveGroundedTotal% active
Japan6144666093.03%
China3481271375292.78%
Ethiopia981311188.29%
Taiwan (Province of China)1752620187.06%
Netherlands (the)1863121785.71%
Mexico2694531485.67%
Viet Nam1793521483.64%
Brazil3917746883.55%
India58212170382.79%
New Zealand972111882.20%

Nigeria still leads the TOP10 countries’ list with the highest percentage of grounded fleets by airline and counting more than 100 registered aircraft, with 69% of its fleet grounded. Nigeria is followed by Hong Kong, Argentina, Singapore, Iran, Malaysia, Philippines, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Italy.

CountryActiveGroundedTotal% grounded
Nigeria327210469.23%
Hong Kong7514722266.22%
Argentina456010557.14%
Singapore9312421757.14%
Iran (Islamic Republic of)10413724156.85%
Malaysia11814025854.26%
Philippines (the)10311621952.97%
Germany25927253151.22%
United Kingdom37837275049.60%
Italy737014348.95%

Another updated analysis is available on the Top 25 lessors (counting more than 50 aircraft in their fleet), with the most active aircraft in their portfolio.

We use ch-aviation fleets advanced and fleets ownership data for this analysis. To get the full and detailed insights on active and inactive aircraft, visit the following LINK.

We have analyzed airports in Europe, Asia, North & South America, Africa, and Oceania by most aircraft grounded. Here is an overview of the Top 25 by each continent, with the most aircraft in temporary storage.

More and more aircraft are coming back out of temporary storage. At the beginning of December, 72% of the global fleet is back in the sky, with 7.998 aircraft still grounded.

Asia and North America are still the regions with the fewest grounded aircraft relative to other parts of the world, counting both 78% (Asia) and 78% (North America) of the fleet as active. Oceania and South America are now slightly behind them, with 75% (Oceania) and 69% (South America) of their current active fleet.

ContinentsActiveGroundedTotal% active
Africa736560129659.71%
Asia76452183982878.35%
Europe38982773667160.89%
North America59641880784477.62%
Oceania57822280074.54%
South America720380110069.43%
TOTAL1954179982753972.49%*
*January 2020 total as a reference

We understand grounded fleets do not fully represent airline activity as airlines inevitably have different utilization levels for specific aircraft.

When it comes to the TOP 10 countries with the highest percentage of active fleets, counting more than 100 registered aircraft, China leads with 93% of the active fleet with 3466 aircraft. The list is followed by Japan, Taiwan, Ethiopia, Viet Nam, New Zealand, India, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, and the USA.

CountryActiveGroundedTotal% active
China3466242370893.47%
Japan6005765791.32%
Taiwan (Province of China)1801919990.45%
Ethiopia971411187.39%
Viet Nam1873121885.78%
New Zealand991911883.90%
India58912171082.96%
Saudi Arabia2074725481.50%
Mexico2506131180.39%
United States of America (the)50561350640678.93%

Nigeria leads the TOP10 countries’ list with the highest percentage of grounded fleets by airline and counting more than 100 registered aircraft. 69% of their fleet is grounded at the moment. They are followed by the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Hong Kong, Austria, Argentina, Malaysia, Singapore, South Africa, Germany, and the Philippines.

CountryActiveGroundedTotal% grounded
Nigeria327010268.63%
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)24251075267.82%
Hong Kong7814222064.55%
Austria8314823164.07%
Argentina386710563.81%
Malaysia9915925861.63%
Singapore9211921156.40%
South Africa9211120354.68%
Germany24728453153.48%
Philippines (the)10611722352.47%

We have also analyzed the top 25 lessors (counting more than 50 aircraft in their fleet), with the most active aircraft in their portfolio.

We use ch-aviation fleets advanced and fleets ownership data for this analysis. To get the full and detailed insights on active and inactive aircraft, visit the following LINK.

Capacity numbers had been rising until August, while September, October, and November have stagnated. As of the beginning of December, the global size of the industry counts 57.8 million seats per week.

This week Asia leads, followed by North America and Europe.

Asia has reached its peak in the first week of November, counting 30.9 million seats, after which the numbers decreased, but again started growing towards the end of November and the first week of December. At the moment, Asia counts 30.8 million seats scheduled.

North America was stagnating for almost two months, showing us pretty varying numbers throughout November. As expected, the week of Thanksgiving was the busiest regarding the capacity since the pandemic outbreak. At the beginning of December, we are now counting a total of 14.5 million seats a week.

After a somewhat better summer with significant growth in mid-August, reaching its peak with 15.9 million scheduled seats, September, October, and November brought a fallback trend and decreasing numbers, with a current capacity of 6.8 million offered seats throughout Europe per week.

South America is on a stable road to recovery for the last two months. It is now reaching a total of 2.8 million seats scheduled per week.

The African market has also shown us light amplitudes up and down but still kept the rising trend. Compared to November, the beginning of December brings growing numbers again, and the market now counts 1.6 million scheduled seats per week.

The recovery in Oceania had kept a positive trend for the last two months and now counts 1.1 million offered seats per week.

With a load factor of 92%, Royal Flight from Russia leads the list of Top 25 Airlines with the highest load factor in October. The lowest load factor in October was Singapore Airlines, with a load factor of 16%.

We will continue to monitor the situation on capacities and will post on our blog. Follow us here and follow our #chaviationcovid19updates on LinkedIn.

We keep monitoring scheduled capacity from airlines worldwide. After the beginning of June and rising numbers of offered seats on all continents, August, September, and October show stagnating numbers. The last week of September reached a peak with 62.1 million seats, while the global size of the industry in mid-October is at 60 million seats per week.

This week Asia leads, followed by North America and Europe.

Asia has reached its peak in the last week of September, counting 31.2 million seats, after which the numbers decreased towards the mid of October. Between October 12th to October 18th, we counted 29.1 million seats. Even with slowly decreasing numbers, Asia is still representing a huge part of the total industry size at this moment – 49%.

The North American region was stagnating for almost two months. Numbers decreased in September and slowly started to rise in October again. By Mid-October, we are now counting a total of 13.8 million seats a week.

After a somewhat better summer with significant growth up until the middle of reaching its peak with 15.9 million scheduled seats, September and October saw decreasing numbers again, with the current capacity at 12.5 million offered seats per week.

In general, South America is slowly growing since the end of September, now reaching a total of 2.1 million seats scheduled per week.

The African market is pretty much stable since Mid-September with light amplitudes up and down. After a minor decrease in numbers at the end of September, the beginning of October brought growing numbers. The market now counts 1.4 million scheduled seats per week.

The recovery in Oceania has stopped and is stagnating for almost three months. Still, September has shown slowly increasing numbers, and we now count 811’348 offered seats per week.

We will continue to monitor the situation on capacities and will post on our blog. Follow us here and follow our #chaviationcovid19updates on LinkedIn.

At ch-aviation, we continually track new aircraft deliveries from the largest aircraft manufacturers: Airbus, ATR, Boeing, Bombardier, COMAC, De Havilland, Embraer, Irkut, and Viking Air

After the lowest point this year, in April, when airlines were accepting only 15 deliveries, we had rapid growth in June and continued growth in July, but August is showing decreasing numbers again. Manufacturers have delivered only 39 new aircraft to airlines globally. 

If we compare numbers to 2019, where we had tracked 92 new aircraft deliveries in August worldwide, we are now seeing a decrease of almost 60%.

At Boeing, after the lowest point in May, with only three aircraft delivered – all of them freighters, in June they doubled their deliveries, but July fell back to an output of just four. In August the US manufacturer delivered nine aircraft, 3 of them for FedEx Express, followed by United Airlines (2), AirBridgeCargo (1), ANA – All Nippon Airways (1), Lufthansa Cargo (1), and Vistara (1).

Airbus has managed to deliver 29 aircraft in August, which equals 65% of the number a year earlier. Their lowest point was reached in April with only eight aircraft delivered, comparing to April 2019 when there were 72 aircraft delivered. From April onwards, we can see a positive trend, reaching a peak in July with 55 aircraft delivered, but again decreasing numbers in August. Out of 29, 3 aircraft were delivered to Wizz Air, followed by Delta Air Lines (2), Lufthansa (2), Shenzhen Airlines (2), Volaris (2), and various airlines with one aircraft only.

We have used ch-aviation fleets advanced for this analysis. If you are interested into more detailed insights, on the following link you can find August deliveries overview with the operator / aircraft variant / registration / delivery date and many other details listed.

Follow our blog and our LinkedIn page for the latest data extracts on #chaviationcovid19updates.

After the peak of 59% of the global fleet grounded at the end of April, more and more aircraft are coming back from temporary storage, but the trend is slowly coming to a halt. At the beginning of September, Airlines had 32% of the global fleet still grounded, with 22.179 aircraft tracked in the ch-aviation fleets advanced database now back in service.

North America and Asia still are the regions with the fewest groundings compared to other parts of the world – 28% and 29%, while Europe (33%) is slightly behind them. When compared to the beginning of August, European airlines brought back 161 aircraft, while Asian carriers are operating 93 more active aircraft. It is interesting to see is that in North America only a single additional aircraft is operating compared to last month.

We can see a significant jump from one month to another when it comes to South America, with 76 reactivated aircraft, and in Africa with 28 reactivated aircraft, but the percentage of their grounded fleet is still at 50%.

Oceania is stagnating at 38% of the total fleet grounded.

We understand grounded fleets do not fully represent airline activity as airlines inevitably have different utilization levels for specific aircraft.

ActiveTotal%, grounded
Africa750149650%
Asia76611083129%
Europe5503823533%
North America7022976728%
Oceania58093138%
South America663133950%
TOTAL221793259932%

When it comes to the TOP 10 countries with the highest percentage of active fleets, counting more than 100 registered aircraft, Hungary leads with 96% of the active fleet with a total of 135 aircraft, followed by the Netherlands, Croatia, Seychelles, China, Luxembourg, Greenland, Slovenia, Tanzania, and Japan.

CountryCount of aircraft%, fleet for the country
Hungary13596%
Netherlands (the)21995%
China355491%
Japan60385%
Malta18285%
Poland14684%
Taiwan (Province of China)18582%
Mexico28679%
France34778%
Ireland35277%

Hong Kong is leading the list of the TOP10 countries with the highest percentage of grounded fleets by airline, and counting more than 100 registered aircraft. Only 36% of their fleet is active at the moment. The list is followed by Thailand, Sweden, Iran, Malaysia, Vietnam, Canada, United Arab Emirates, Australia, and Indonesia.

CountryCount of aircraft%, fleet for the country
Hong Kong10836%
Thailand14246%
Sweden12249%
Iran (Islamic Republic of)14151%
Malaysia14653%
Vietnam12053%
Canada53854%
United Arab Emirates (the)31858%
Australia38358%
Indonesia39760%

We use ch-aviation fleets advanced and fleets ownership data for this analysis. In order to get the full and detailed insight on active and inactive aircraft, visit the following link.

We keep monitoring scheduled capacity from airlines worldwide. August has shown an increasing number of seats within all continents, while the first half of September shows slowly dropping or stagnating numbers. When reaching the peak at the beginning of August, the global size of the industry was counting 61.1 million seats per week, while the beginning of September brings us to 57.6 million seats.  

This week Asia leads in the top seat, followed by Europe and North America.

Asia has reached its peak in the first week of August, counting 29.4 million seats, after which it dropped to 27.6 million and keeps stagnating until this week with 27.2 million seats.

Mid of August brought significant growth to Europe – from 13.7 million seats at the beginning of August to 15.9 million in the middle of August. September, however, brought the decreasing numbers, with the current capacity of 14.3 million seats given new entry restrictions and quarantine requirements coupled with the end of the summer leisure high season.

The North America region is stagnating for almost the last two months.  After significant growth at the beginning of July, capacity growth has now flattened, with a total of 12.6 million seats scheduled this week.

From 10.7 million in the last week of August to 16.0 million seats in the first week of September, South America had a growth of 48% in one week only. The second week of September, however, shows decreasing numbers again, with a total of 13.9 million seats.

Africa has reached its peak in the first week of August with 1.3 million seats, followed by dropped numbers (1.1 million) in the very next week. From there, it has been stagnating, although the second week of September shows us slow growth. Now, the market counts 1.2 million scheduled seats.

After the beginning of June and growing numbers, the recovery in Oceania has stopped and is stagnating until now. The industry now counts 716.704 seats.

We will continue to monitor the situation on capacities and will post on our blog. Follow us here and follow our #chaviationcovid19updates on LinkedIn.

We continue to monitor scheduled capacity from airlines around the world. For the last two weeks the global size of the industry stands at 61 million scheduled weekly seats. We can see airlines in Europe are putting more and more seats into the supply, while other regions have flatter curves in capacity development.

We continue to monitor the data from the ch-aviation capacities module.

Asia, the first region to bring optimism to the industry, maintains very slow growth for the last five weeks. On average, for the last month, airlines are adding around 2.5% more seats each week. Chinese airlines are driving the capacity up – 9 of largest 10 airlines in the region by scheduled capacity are now airlines from China with the addition of ANA – All Nipon Airways in the fourth position by total capacity. The region continues to stay at slightly lower than 30 million scheduled weekly seats.

The second-largest region in the industry, North America, remains almost flat for the last four weeks. Airlines managed to add only 1 million seats during last five weeks and the size of the market now stands at 14.2 million seats compared to the “normal” of 30 million pre- Covid-19.

Airlines in Europe are not losing optimism and continue to add more seats into the supply. The market has more than doubled compared to the middle of June and now airlines have 13.8 million seats for the current week. If the trend continues, Europe may become a larger aviation market than North America in next few weeks, despite the fact that international flying is dominating European traffic and airlines (and passengers) need do deal with travel limitations imposed by various countries.

Low-cost airlines are now driving the recovery in Europe, with Ryanair taking 11.2% of capacity share this week, followed by Wizz Air (5.7%) and easyJet (4.2%). The subsidiary of Ryanair, Malta Air, takes fourth with another 4.2% of capacity share. easyJet numbers also are complemented by easyJet Europe numbers – this subsidiary takes sixth place with 3.7% market share. Air France has the largest capacity among flag carrier groups with 3.8% of capacity share, standing at fifth by scheduled seat capacity for the current week.

There is a very small positive sign in South America, where airlines added 10% more seats with the start of August. Still, the industry in this region is way below 20% of the size of what we saw the same time last year. The largest airlines in South America for now – GOL Linhas Aéreas Inteligentes, LATAM Airlines and Azul Linhas Aéreas Brasileiras — currently take 72% of total capacity in the region with an almost equal split among them.

The pace of the recovery in Africa remains slow, but the market has started to show some signs of the recovery at least. Carriers in Africa now have 1.3 million seats scheduled to depart the current week.

There is no recovery in the Oceania region as airlines now need to fight again with slow demand from additional imposed travel limitations. After jumping from the bottom in May and June, airlines now need to take a break for recovery to continue. Oceania remains the most heavily affected region worldwide by the drop in the capacity.

We will continue to monitor the situation on capacities and will post on our blog. Follow us here and follow our #chaviationcovid19updates on Linkedin.