At ch-aviation we are tracking new aircraft deliveries of the largest aircraft manufacturers: Airbus, Boeing, Bombardier, COMAC, De Havilland, Embraer and Irkut. An analysis of deliveries for the first two months of 2020 already shows results impacted by Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic.

December is the busiest month for manufacturers with new aircraft deliveries as most manufacturers try to deliver as many aircraft as possible in the calendar year. The first two months are usually slower than year-end, but deliveries in the first two months of 2020 are significantly lower than same two months a year earlier.

Boeing deliveries last spring were hit by the grounding of Boeing 737MAX aircraft, the most popular type in Boeing’s portfolio. Still, we can see January and February were significantly slower months for Boeing than any month in 2019.

Airbus also had a slower month in January than the year before, but the European manufacturer was able to deliver more aircraft in February than a year earlier. Their result was positively impacted by more Airbus A220 deliveries (5 vs 2 in February 2020 vs February 2019).

We don’t need to look far to see where the slower tempo of new aircraft deliveries is taking place.

The number of new deliveries in China, Hong Kong and Macao stopped when the region entered Covid-19. We noticed massive groundings of aircraft in these countries in February and new aircraft deliveries also stopped. There were no new aircraft deliveries to airlines from China, Hong Kong and Macao in February when 20 new aircraft were delivered on average per month in 2019. The last new aircraft was Airbus A320NEO delivered to Spring Airlines on January 22, 2020.

Based on what we saw in China/Hong Kong/Macao we can expect aircraft deliveries slowed down in Europe too. Europe was third-largest market by new aircraft deliveries in 2019:

We recommend you to follow our news bulletin updated every hour to get latest understanding are the real plans for the airlines to react to existing situation.

We used ch-aviation fleets advanced for this analysis.

Follow our blog and our LinkedIn page for the latest data extracts on #chaviationcovid19updates.

A growing number of airlines across the planet started drastic fleet, network and staffing cuts in an effort to combat the economic impact of Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic. Follow our updates: Airline COVID-19 capacity, network, staff cuts for 17-22MAR.

Our analysis of ch-aviation capacities shows most of the the capacity cut in scheduled flights it is not drastic and airlines remain optimistic flights to recover during Easter vacation period and will grow further preparing for the summer season.

We understand currently airline after airline is grounding their fleet or reducing capacity and we could expect further drop of scheduled flights before the end of the week. We will continue to monitor capacity situation in the beginning of next week.

We see scheduled capacity growth in Asia for next weeks which comes in line with our previous analysis showing recovery in China domestic market and growing number of active aircraft at Chinese airlines fleets.

South America, Africa and Oceania are relatively unaffected at the moment, but it is few times smaller markets compared to Asia, North America and Europe. Asia being the largest with around 40 million seats to depart each week, followed by North America (28 million) and Europe (27 million). South America is significantly smaller 5-million seats per week market when Africa and Oceania are even smaller.

We will continue to monitor schedule changes next week to understand what is the total capacity cut in different regions.

We recommend you to follow our news bulletin updated every hour to get latest understanding are the real plans for the airlines to react to existing situation.

We used ch-aviation capacities data for this analysis.

Follow our blog and our LinkedIn page for the latest data extracts on #chaviationcovid19updates.

In times like these, you need a source you can trust.

The situation around the world is changing every day and every hour when it comes to government-enforced restrictions, increased border controls or airline decisions to reduce or suspend their operations.

We are constantly monitoring the latest updates from 4 continents now and there are 5 articles being updated with the latest information with free access to everyone.

Refresh the following articles to get updates:

GLOBAL UPDATES BULLETIN: Airline COVID-19 capacity, network, staff cuts for 17-22MAR

EUROPE: European carriers suspend ops amid increased border controls

ASIA: Asian carriers hit as gov’ts restrict int’l flights

AFRICA: African gov’ts restrict int’l ops in bid to curb COVID-19

NORTH AMERICA: North American gov’ts clamp down on int’l ops

GLOBAL (archived, updated until March 17th, 2020): Global airlines cut capacity, staff, costs due to COVID-19

Follow our blog and our LinkedIn page for the latest data extracts on #chaviationcovid19updates.

Back in the middle of February this year, we looked at the groundings of aircraft by Chinese airlines. Our data team updates information every day and, as of February 12, 2020, we found that 1,215 aircraft operated by airlines from China, Hong Kong and Macao had been grounded.

The latest analysis of ch-aviation fleets advanced data shows the number of active aircraft in this group of countries started to increase again from the beginning of March.

But if we look at the split of countries, then China shows an even higher rate of recovery of active aircraft while the number of active aircraft in Hong Kong still goes down.

We will continue to monitor the aircraft activity further and we plan to release an update after a week.

At the same time, ch-aviation capacities data shows the growth of China domestic traffic.

Chinese airlines schedule to grow the number of seats in the domestic market by 50% during the next 7 weeks. Airlines had 8,4 million seats scheduled for the week from March 9th to 15th and currently have scheduled 12,7 million scheudled for the week April 20 to 26th.

We continue to monitor capacity shifts in China and we see the airlines reduced the number of seats scheduled for the current and the next weeks compared to capacity they had scheduled week before. But optimism is growing for a stronger recovery at the begining of April.

On 13th of March, we have covered in the ch-aviation PRO newsfeed that the Civil Aviation of China (CAAC) announced new support measures to aid the aviation industry affected by the ongoing COVID-19 epidemic. A total of 16 new measures include a reduction of fees at the airports, direct financial support, optimisation of licencing and schedule approval processes and others. Earlier in March, CAAC also announced subsidies for routes to stimulate demand in conjunction with the Ministry of Finance.

We follow 52 airlines operating domestic flights in China (41 of them operates passenger flights). The 10 largest airlines have about 70% of total scheduled capacity with China Southern Airlines, China Eastern Airlines and Air China having a double-digit percentage of market share.

 AirlineCapacity% of Total
1China Southern Airlines153160017,61%
2China Eastern Airlines99404111,43%
3Air China90673910,42%
4Xiamen Airlines6223587,15%
5Shenzhen Airlines4946255,69%
6Sichuan Airlines4783615,50%
7Hainan Airlines3659114,21%
8Shandong Airlines3649164,19%
9Spring Airlines3452403,97%
10Juneyao Air2203002,53%

We used ch-aviation fleets advanced and ch-aviation capacities data for this analysis.

Follow our blog and our LinkedIn page for the latest data extracts on #chaviationcovid19updates.

Italy remains the largest affected European country during the ongoing spread of the COVID-19 virus. Many airlines have announced cancellations or reduced frequencies throughout Italy. The largest airline in the market, Ryanair, is suspending all of its flights to and from Italy between March 13 and April 8, according to a statement the ultra-low-cost carrier issued to investors.

We analyzed the ch-aviation capacities module to understand what airlines are most exposed with Italy operations and which are the largest destination markets from Italy.

Based on ch-aviation capacities scheduled for the current week (March 9 to 15, 2020) we see 35.5% of capacity scheduled from Italian airports are for domestic flights.

The market leader by seats scheduled in Italy is Ryanair with more than 0.5 million seats scheduled to depart this week. The Irish airline takes almost one-third of the market capacity with flights from Italian airports. Ryanair is the second-largest carrier at Rome Fiumicino and Milan Malpensa, Italy’s two biggest airports, and it is the dominant airline at the country’s third-largest facility, controlling 88% of weekly seats at Milan Bergamo.

Airline Number of seats Share of seats, %
Ryanair 509.544 32,65%
Alitalia 277.018 17,75%
easyJet Europe 183.788 11,78%
Wizz Air 55.771 3,57%
Vueling Airlines 48.052 3,08%
easyJet 36.749 2,35%
British Airways 32.569 2,09%
Volotea 25.950 1,66%
Air France 25.538 1,64%
Lufthansa 25.108 1,61%

Four countries had more than 100,000 seats scheduled from Italian airports per week.

The leading destination markets are United Kingdom, followed by Spain, Germany and France.

Country Number of seats Share of seats, %
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the) 153.074 15,22%
Spain 142.578 14,18%
Germany 108.322 10,77%
France 102.890 10,23%
Netherlands (the) 46.268 4,60%
Romania 35.232 3,50%
Russian Federation (the) 28.912 2,88%
Belgium 28.766 2,86%
Poland 26.328 2,62%
Portugal 24.176 2,40%

The two largest international airports with the highest capacity of flights to Italy are actually in Spain – Madrid Barajas and Barcelona El Prat.

Airport Number of seats Share of seats, %
Madrid Barajas (MAD) 50.663 5,04%
Barcelona El Prat (BCN) 44.991 4,47%
London Gatwick (LGW) 44.428 4,42%
Paris CDG (CDG) 43.178 4,29%
Amsterdam Schiphol (AMS) 40.111 3,99%
London Stansted (STN) 38.667 3,85%
London Heathrow (LHR) 25.293 2,52%
Munich (MUC) 24.096 2,40%
Paris Orly (ORY) 23.669 2,35%
Frankfurt Int’l (FRA) 22.760 2,26%

Data from the the ch-aviation capacities module

The United States will suspend entry for travellers coming from the Schengen Area, covering 26 European countries, effective on midnight, March 13, 2020, President Donald Trump announced in an Oval Office address.

“We will be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States for the next 30 days. The new rules will go into effect Friday at midnight. These restrictions will be adjusted subject to conditions on the ground,” Trump said.

According to a follow-up statement issued by the Department of Homeland Security, the presidential proclamation covers all foreign nationals who have been to any of the Schengen Area countries “at any point during the 14 days prior to their scheduled arrival to the United States.”

The Schengen Zone includes all European Union members except for the United Kingdom, Ireland, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, and Cyprus, as well as Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, and Liechtenstein, which are not EU members.

Read the full story in our news feed.

We have looked at the countries and airlines which will be most affected by the new limitations based on the ch-aviation capacities data as of this week (starting March 9, 2020).

There are 8 countries in the Schengen Zone which do not have any scheduled flights to the US this week. The list includes Czechia, Estonia, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Malta, Slovakia and Slovenia.

In total, there are 432 566 seats scheduled from March 9 to 15. 27% of these seats are scheduled from Germany.

Country Number of seats
Germany 119 231
France 83 621
Netherlands (the) 60 394
Spain 43 319
Switzerland 26 232
Italy 21 710
Portugal 16 714
Iceland 11 653
Belgium 11 435
Denmnark 10 005

The largest alliance affected by the grounding is Star Alliance with 193 454 seats scheduled between the Schengen Zone and the US currently. SkyTeam has 138 206 seats scheduled and oneworld has a relatively low impact with 49 806 seats scheduled (mainly because the largest European oneworld carrier British Airways is based in UK).

Airline Number of seats
Lufthansa 69 163
Delta Air Lines 67 781
United Airlines 57 265
Air France 38 279
American Airlines 30 199
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines 22 478
Norwegian 19 810
Swiss 18 390
SAS Scandinavian Airlines 16 599
Iberia 15 852
TAP Air Portugal 13 078
Icelandair 11 653
LOT Polish Airlines 7 632
Alitalia 7 004
Emirates 5 901

Data from the the ch-aviation capacities module

 

We are following 4,145 aircraft operated by 87 carriers in China in our ch-aviation fleets advanced database. In a picture of the coronavirus spread, our aircraft data team updates information every day about the grounded aircraft due to reduced operations by Chinese airlines.

We also follow 87 of Boeing 737MAX aircraft grounded in airports in China since March 2019.

As of February 12, 2020, we see 1215 aircraft operated by airlines from China, Hong Kong and Macao grounded (including passenger aircraft and cargo aircraft).

The following airlines have the most of their fleet grounded in China:

Operator Aircraft on Ground Total Aircraft % of Grounded
China Eastern Airlines 191 556 33,7%
China Southern Airlines 173 530 32,6%
Air China 119 428 27,8%
Hainan Airlines 100 227 44,1%
Sichuan Airlines 65 159 40,9%
Shenzhen Airlines 51 187 27,3%
Xiamen Airlines 50 167 29,9%
Tianjin Airlines 47 95 49,5%
Shanghai Airlines 35 105 33,3%
Capital Airlines 33 83 39,8%

The following airlines are exposed the most with these groundings, as these airlines have the largest share of their fleet grounded (all 50%+):

China Xinhua Airlines 2 2 100%
Henan Airlines 20 30 66,7%
China Grand Air 2 3 66,7%
Okay Airways 17 26 65,4%
GX Airlines 14 27 51,9%

The airports with the most of these aircraft parked are the following:

Beijing Capital 103
Guangzhou Baiyun International 79
Hangzhou Xiaoshan International 60
Xi’an Xianyang International 59
Urumqi Diwopu International 58
Chengdu Shuangliu International 54

We also see these are the types of the aircraft mostly affected by the groundings by Chinese airlines:

Aircraft Type Aircraft on Ground Total Aircraft % of Grounded
B737-800 325 1194 27,11%
A320-200 180 848 21,23%
A321-200 114 361 31,58%
A320-200N 70 196 35,71%
A330-300 62 199 31,16%
A319-100 47 173 27,17%

Following up the news on the British regional carrier flybe facing a cash shortage and urgently seeking extra cash to avoid collapse, we took a look at what possibilites and outcomes face the industry, namely, airports.

Short reminder: The airline already faced a collapse in late 2018 when it was saved at the last minute by a takeover bid submitted by Connect Airways, a consortium of Virgin AtlanticStobart Group, and Cyrus Capital. However, seems like problems occurred this year as well.

Flybe represents the 3rd largest domestic carrier by capacity in the United Kingdom with 23,5% share, after easyJet and British Airways.

AirlineCapacity% of total
easyJet151.73636,53%
British Airways126.13730,37%
flybe.97.76923,54%
Loganair26.6246,41%
Aer Lingus7.3081,76%
Ryanair4.1581,00%
Skybus (United Kingdom)1.0640,26%
Directflight3240,08%
Hebridean Air Services2700,06%

When it comes to frequency, the airline operates the most domestic flights in the United Kingdom, with every 1 of 3 domestic flights operated by flybe:

AirlineFrequency% of total
flybe.1.33133,01%
easyJet90022,32%
British Airways81620,24%
Loganair79919,82%
Skybus (United Kingdom)561,39%
Aer Lingus421,04%
Directflight360,89%
Hebridean Air Services300,74%
Ryanair220,55%

With it’s fleet of 67, flybe operates capacity out of 42 airports next week – 23 in the UK.

AirportCapacity% of Total
Manchester Int'l (MAN), GB19.85214,84%
Birmingham Int'l (BHX), GB18.08213,51%
Southampton (SOU), GB17.35512,97%
Belfast City (BHD), GB16.39412,25%
Edinburgh (EDI), GB13.66810,22%
London Heathrow (LHR), GB7.1765,36%
Aberdeen Dyce (ABZ), GB5.9594,45%
London City (LCY), GB5.9464,44%
Glasgow Int'l (GLA), GB5.9204,42%
Exeter (EXT), GB5.1483,85%
Cardiff (CWL), GB4.9103,67%
Newquay (NQY), GB2.5741,92%
Leeds/Bradford (LBA), GB2.1511,61%
East Midlands (EMA), GB1.9811,48%
Newcastle, GB (NCL), GB1.9641,47%
Liverpool (LPL), GB1.4261,07%
London Southend (SEN), GB1.0180,76%
Inverness (INV), GB5660,42%
Teesside (MME), GB5210,39%
Humberside (HUY), GB4490,34%
Bristol Int'l (BRS), GB2980,22%
Anglesey (VLY), GB2900,22%
Wick (WIC), GB1450,11%

The highest number of flights scheduled in the week from 13th of January to 19th of January 2020 to be operated by flybe is from Manchester (250 per week), followed by Southampton (235), Birmingham (220) and Belfast City (205):

AirportCapacity% of Total
Manchester Int'l (MAN), GB25013,95%
Southampton (SOU), GB23513,11%
Birmingham Int'l (BHX), GB22012,28%
Belfast City (BHD), GB20511,44%
Edinburgh (EDI), GB1719,54%
Aberdeen Dyce (ABZ), GB1065,92%
London Heathrow (LHR), GB925,13%
Glasgow Int'l (GLA), GB
754,19%
Cardiff (CWL), GB734,07%
London City (LCY), GB724,02%
Exter (EXT), GB663,68%
Newcastle, GB (NCL), GB392,18%
Leeds/Bradford (LBA), GB372,06%
Newquay (NQY), GB331,84%
East Midlands (EMA), GB271,51%
Liverpool (LPL), GB191,06%
London Southend (SEN), GB150,84%
Teesside (MME), GB
150,84%
Humberside (HUY), GB140,78%
Anglesey (VLY), GB100,56%
Inverness (INV), GB70,39%
Bristol Int'l (BRS), GB60,33%
Wick (WIC), GB50,28%

According to the data available at ch-aviation capacities module, we have summarized the possible consequences on airports if flybe suspends operations.

Here is the list of 12 (out of 23) to be most affected UK airports with more than 10% of the flybe capacity, led by Anglesey, where flybe is the only operator. Airports like Southampton, Newquay, Exter Belfast City and Cardiff tend to have the highest risk:

Airport% of flybe. capacity
Anglesey (VLY), GB100,00%
Southampton (SOU), GB
93,44%
Newquay (NQY), GB78,57%
Exeter (EXT), GB67,69%
Belfast City (BHD), GB66,15%
Cardiff (CWL), GB45,79%
Wick (WIC), GB42,27%
Teesside (MME), GB24,75%
Aberdeen Dyce (ABZ), GB20,82%
Humberside (HUY), GB19,51%
Birmingham Int'l (BHX), GB16,75%
Edinburgh (EDI), GB10,77%

A similar picture emerges by the number of departures, but this time we have 19 airports with more than 10% of flights operated by flybe.  Again, the list is led by the Anglesey and followed by Southampton, Exter, Belfast City, Newquay, Cardiff, Wick, etc.

Airport% of flybe. frequency
Anglesey (VLY), GB100,00%
Southampton (SOU), GB89,69%
Exeter (EXT), GB83,54%
Belfast City (BHD), GB78,54%
Newquay (NQY), GB75,00%
Cardiff (CWL), GB65,18%
Wick (WIC), GB45,45%
Teesside (MME), GB45,45%
Humberside (HUY), GB41,18%
Birmingham Int'l (BHX), GB30,56%
Aberdeen Dyce (ABZ), GB30,37%
Leeds/Bradford (LBA), GB21,89%
Edinburgh (EDI), GB18,87%
Manchester Int'l (MAN), GB18,32%
East Midlands (EMA), GB15,61%
Newcastle, GB (NCL), GB14,72%
Glasgow Int'l (GLA), GB12,98%
London Southend (SEN), GB11,28%
London City (LCY), GB10,81%

The overall picture shows tremendous affects for some regional airports in the UK as flybe is the largest domestic operator in the UK in terms of flights frequency.

ch-aviation capacities module provides instant detailed capacity, frequency and market share information by airlines and airports worldwide.

Following up on the news about FAA bans US carriers from overflying Iran, Iraq, the Gulf, we have looked at some data from the ch-aviation capacities module to understand possible impacts on the industry.

Quick reminder: the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued three Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) barring American civilian carriers from overflying Iraq, Iran, the Persian Gulf, and the Gulf of Oman at any level. The FAA issued the ban “due to heightened military activities and increased political tensions in the Middle East, which present an inadvertent risk to US civil aviation operations,” following a night of Iranian rocket strikes on US military bases in Iraq.

We have, however, detected that no flights to the USA or flights operated by US carriers were scheduled to Iran or Iraq for the upcoming week 13.01. – 19.01.2020.

81% of the scheduled flights in Iran (21% in Iraq) next week of January are domestic flights, but we have filtered some interesting information out of more than 1,000 scheduled international flights that could be affected by the current situation. Here you can find them filtered by capacity and listed as countries, airlines, and airports:

FLIGHTS FROM IRAN

The total number of international flights scheduled for the next week (13.01.-19.01.) from Iran is 479. Of this number, the most affected flights are to these countries:

IRAN INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS NUMBER OF SEATS OFFERED
1. Turkey, TR 28.718
2. United Arab Emirates (the), AE 17.108
3. Iraq, IQ 10.286
4. Qatar, QA 9.229
5. China, CN 4.633
6. Germany, DE 3.333
7. Oman, OM 3.297
8. Kuwait, KW 3.218
9. Armenia, AM 2.100
10. Austria, AT 1.690

When it comes to the Airlines, the domestic ones are surely and highly affected – Mahan Air & Iran air. following with Turkish Airlines, Qatar Airways, Iraqi Airways, Emirates, flydubai, AtlasGlobal, and Air Arabia. Caspian Airlines, another domestic company, finishes the list of top 10.

MOST AFFECTED AIRLINES NUMBER OF SEATS OFFERED
1. Mahan Air 28.772
2. Iran Air 14.369
3. Turkish Airlines 9.271
4. Qatar Airways 8.317
5. Iraqi Airways 5.174
6. Emirates 4.852
7. flydubai 3.531
8. AtlasGlobal 3.027
9. Air Arabia 3.024
10. Caspian Airlines 2.952

TOP 10 airports that are most likely to be affected with possible limitations from Iran in the upcoming week:

MOST AFFECTED AIRPORT NUMBER OF SEATS OFFERED
1. Istanbul New (IST), TR 23.547
2. Dubai Int’I (DOH), QA 14.084
3. Doha Hamad Int’I (DOH), QA 9.229
4. Najaf (NFJ), IQ 4.798
5. Baghdad (BGW), IQ 3.350
6. Muscat (MCT), OM 3.297
7. Kuwait (KWI), KW 3.182
8. Sharjah (SHJ), AE 3.024
9. Frankfurt Int’I (FRA), DE 2.619
10. Yerevan (EVN), AM 2.100

FLIGHTS FROM IRAQ

The total number of international flights scheduled for next week from Iraq is 670. Here are potentially the most affected countries, with Turkey leading the capacity of 33.094 seats offered.

IRAQ INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS NUMBER OF SEATS OFFERED
1. Turkey, TR 33.094
2. United Arab Emirates (the), AE 14.579
3. Qatar, QA 10.304
4. Iran (Islamic Republic of), IR 9.842
5. Jordan, JO 6.527
6. Lebanon, LB 6.018
7. Saudi Arabia, SA 4.178
8. Syrian Arab Republic (the), SY 3.320
9. Egypt, EG 3.275
10. Bahrain, BH 2.407

Three out of 10 of the most affected airlines are domestic, followed by, as expected, Turkish and Qatar Airways.

MOST AFFECTED AIRLINES NUMBER OF SEATS OFFERED
1. Iraqi Airways 29.713
2. Turkish Airlines 11.203
3. Qatar Airways 10.304
4. Fly Baghdad 9.238
5. flydubai 5.439
6. Pegasus Airlines 5.049
7. Emirates 4.196
8. AtlasGlobal 4.047
9. Royal Jordanian 3.583
10. UR Airlines 3.108

If limitations lead to an increased number of canceled flights from Iraq the following airports may be most affected, with Istanbul at the top of the list.

MOST AFFECTED AIRPORT NUMBER OF SEATS OFFERED
1. Istanbul New (IST), TR 18.883
2. Dubai Int’I (DOH), QA 12.227
3. Doha Hamad Int’I (DOH), QA 10.304
4. Istanbul Sabiha Gocken (SAW), TR 7.826
5. Amman Queen Alia (AMM), JO 6.527
6. Beirut (BEY), LB 6.018
7. Tehran Imam Khomeini (IKA), IR 5.643
8. Mashad (MHD), IR 3.693
9. Ankara Esenboga (ESB), TR 3.669
10. Damascus (DAM), SY 3.320

 

Swiss airline intelligence provider ch-aviation today revealed the names of the world’s youngest airline fleets, measured in average aircraft age. It is the second such ch-aviation analysis on the topic, and the company’s first report was published two years ago in August 2017. Analysis shows several of the youngest airline fleets are in Asia, while “Norwegian Air Sweden” tops the list as the commercial carrier with the youngest fleet of aircraft on a global scale. “VietJetAir” has the youngest aircraft fleet of the large airlines (those with 50 aircraft or more). In the very large airline category, (100 aircraft or more) “Aeroflot” takes the crown for the youngest airline fleet.

The average aircraft flying the globe is 12 years old, shows ch-aviation’s analysis of more than 30’000 active commercial aircraft. This includes passenger and cargo aircraft.

The youngest airline fleets are in Asia with an average age of 8,5 years. The oldest fleets are in the Africa and Oceania regions, where the average fleet is more than 16 years old.

“Our data clearly shows that Asian airlines continue to see tremendous growth, especially the low-cost carriers. This coupled with good access to capital for new aircraft leads to the youngest fleets being in this part of the world” said Thomas Jaeger, ch-aviation CEO.

The airline with the world’s youngest fleet is “Norwegian Air Sweden” which operates a small fleet of 5 aircraft with an average age of 0,74 years. Interestingly, the Swedish subsidiary of “Norwegian” took the crown from another of the firm’s subsidiaries, “Norwegian UK” which was named as having the world’s youngest fleet in 2017. This year “Norwegian UK” took 3rd place, giving up the lead not only to its Swedish sister, but also to “Wizz Air UK”.

Mr. Jaeger further elaborated on Europe’s youngest airline fleets: “We found the interesting phenomenon in Europe where the youngest fleets belong to airlines operating as branded, in-house subsidiaries of larger airline groups. The uncertainty of Brexit, airlines looking for lower-cost operating models and a flux of other reasons mean European airlines are creating subsidiaries in different countries and in many cases moving their youngest aircraft to these newly created entities. Good examples are “Norwegian”, “Wizz Air”, “Ryanair” and “SAS” – these airline groups took all 5 leading places in Europe”.

The airline with the youngest fleet in Asia is Saudi low-cost airline “flyadeal” which operates a fleet of 12 aircraft with an average age of just more than a year. The youngest fleet in South America also belongs to a low-cost airline, in this case, Chile’s “JetSMART”. Interestingly, both of these leading airlines in Asia and South America started operations as recently as 2017. Kenyan low-cost airline “Jambojet” leads Africa’s list with an average aircraft age of 4,3 years.

Canadian regional airline “WestJet Encore” and French Polynesia’s “Air Tahiti” are two airlines that reached the top place in their regions’ youngest fleet ranking in both 2017 and 2019. “WestJet Encore” was the airline with the youngest fleet in North America in 2017 with 40 aircraft and an average age of 2,2 years. In 2019, the fleet had aged to 3,9 years on average, but it was good enough to keep its position in the region. The “Air Tahiti” fleet is now slightly younger than it was two years ago (around four years on average), and this fact guaranteed them the number one position in Oceania.

“This year, we also looked at the youngest fleets for larger airlines separately, because fleet renewal for these airlines is more complex and requires more capital than for small start-ups,” says Thomas Jaeger. “In the category of airlines with 50 aircraft or more, we see Asian low-cost airlines dominating the list. The list of the youngest fleet with 100 aircraft or more, is led by Russian national carrier Aeroflot”.

The youngest fleets worldwide:

Operator Average aircraft age Home base No of aircraft incl.
Norwegian Air Sweden 0.74 Sweden 5
Wizz Air UK 0.95 UK 10
Norwegian UK 1.04 UK 13
SAS Scandinavian Airlines Ireland 1.30 Ireland 9
Flyadeal 1.34 Saudi Arabia 11

The youngest fleets in Africa:

Jambojet 4.31 Kenya 5
Royal Air Maroc Express 6.03 Morocco 6
Air Austral 6.05 Reunion 8
Ethiopian Airlines 6.11 Ethiopia 104
RwandAir 6.17 Rwanda 12

The youngest fleets in Asia:

flyadeal 1.34 Saudi Arabia 11
JTA – Japan Transocean Air 1.70 Japan 12
Air Travel 2.46 China 9
Qazaq Air 2.57 Kazakhstan 26
Kunming Airlines 2.68 China 26

The youngest fleets in Europe:

Norwegian Air Sweden 0.74 Sweden 5
Wizz Air UK 0.95 UK 10
Norwegian UK 1.04 UK 13
SAS Scandinavian Airlines Ireland 1.30 Ireland 9
Malta Air 1.79 Malta 11

The youngest fleets in North America:

WestJet Encore 3.85 Canada 47
Frontier Airlines 3.90 USA 90
Swoop 3.94 Canada 7
VivaAerobus 3.96 Mexico 34
Volaris 4.61 Mexico 75

The youngest fleets in Oceania:

Air Tahiti 4.03 French Polynesia 10
Mount Cook Airline 6.93 New Zealand 29
Air New Zealand 7.12 New Zealand 65
Virgin Australia International 7.34 Australia 20
Air Tahiti Nui 7.57 French Polynesia 5

The youngest fleets in South America:

JetSMART 1.66 Chile 8
Viva Air Colombia 4.36 Colombia 14
LATAM Express 4.73 Chile 13
LATAM Airlines 5.85 Chile 46
Azul Linhas Aéreas Brasileiras 5.99 Brazil 137

 

The youngest worldwide among large airlines (50 aircraft or more):

Operator Average aircraft age Home base No of aircraft
VietJetAir 3.24 Vietnam 66
GoAir 3.42 India 51
Batik Air 3.49 Indonesia 58
Frontier Airlines 3.90 USA 90
Norwegian Air International 4.32 Ireland 67

The youngest worldwide among extra-large airlines (100 aircraft or more):

Aeroflot 4.70 Russia 250
Hainan Airlines 5.06 China 237
Saudia 5.13 Saudi Arabia 155
Wizz Air 5.43 Hungary 104
Sichuan Airlines 5.65 China 155

ch-aviation included only commercial carriers with five or more aircraft with 30-plus seats. Data from “ch-aviation fleets advanced” as of August 2019.